Last edited by Bagami
Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients found in the catalog.

Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients

Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients

the positions of the NCRP and the ICRP

  • 27 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Division of Regulatory Applications, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pregnant women -- Radiography,
  • Radiography, Medical -- Complications,
  • Radiation -- Safety measures,
  • Breastfeeding

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by C. B. Meinhold ; prepared for Division of Regulatory Applications, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
    ContributionsBrookhaven National Laboratory., U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Division of Regulatory Applications.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationvii, 14 p.
    Number of Pages14
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17596100M
    OCLC/WorldCa42240967

      They include the traditional 3 tenets of radiation safety: time, distance, and appropriate shielding. Estimated radiation exposure for NMTs ranges from to 2 μSv/h, depending on whether NMTs are scanning patients (lower dose) or performing injections on patients (higher dose).   Breast-feeding during Radiation Therapy It’s important to speak with your doctor if you’re having any type of radiation treatment for cancer. The level of risk this form of treatment poses depends in part on what area of your body will be exposed to radiation, and what form of radiation you’ll be getting.

      Introduction. Malignancies in pregnant women account for –% of all cancers. They are associated with –% of all pregnancies; one in – pregnancies is complicated by the presence of cancer in the mother [1, 2].There is some controversy about the effects of pregnancy on the progression and prognosis of by: Pregnancy and Radiation Protection. nuclear medicine and other specialties radiation protection of a pregnant woman as a patient, as well as .

    Radiation Exposure During Pregnancy There are two kinds of radiation exposure that pregnant women worry about. The first is called nonionizing radiation, which comes from household appliances such as microwave ovens and TV sets. The . Pregnant and work with lasers in a medical skin clinic: Q – Dermatologist using laser: Q – Use of fluorescent microscopy: Q – Can UVC rays harm my baby? Q – Iodine body scan before getting pregnant: Q – Interrupt breast-feeding because of indium Q – Does receiving radiation after pregnancy.


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Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients Download PDF EPUB FB2

@article{osti_, title = {Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients. The positions of the NCRP and the ICRP}, author = {Meinhold, C B}, abstractNote = {For many years, protecting the fetus has been a concern of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP).

National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) regarding the radiation safety concerns associated with the administration of radiation or radioactive materials to patients or human research subjects who may be pregnant or breast-feeding a chi 1 : C.

Meinhold. Radiation Dose Concerns for the Pregnant or Lactating Patient Article in Seminars in Nuclear Medicine 44(6) November with 74 Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Michael Stabin.

For many years, protecting the fetus has been a concern of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Early recommendations focused on the possibility of a wide variety of detrimental developmental effects while later Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients book focused on the potential for Author: C.

Meinhold. Get this from a library. Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients: the positions of the NCRP and the ICRP. [C B Meinhold; Brookhaven National Laboratory.; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Division of. @article{osti_, title = {Considerations regarding the unintended radiation exposure of the embryo, fetus or nursing child}, author = {Not Available}, abstractNote = {In Commentary No.

7, Misadministration of Radioactive Material in Medicine - Scientific Background (NCRP, ), the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) reviewed the. Ten of 16 patients who had radiation claimed to have enough breast milk production as compared with all 8 patients who never received above the diaphragm radiotherapy (p = ).[6] A woman who had a partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy became pregnant and delivered a healthy infant 16 months after radiation therapy.

pregnant patients and referring physicians may perceive the risk of imaging studies with ionizing radiation to be high [7]. There - fore, it is important that the radiologist be prepared to discuss radiation safety concerns with the patient and referring physician.

The radiation dose from bilateral two-view digital and film-screen mammogra. Radiation exposures of pregnant or potentially pregnant medical patients is always an area of acute concern, due to the known radiosensitivity of the unborn child.

For diagnostic studies (x-rays, computed tomography, diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures), concerns are real, but overshadowed of course by the concerns related to any therapeutic Cited by: 6. If you find that you still have concerns, you should contact the Radiation Safety Officer at University of Virginia Policy ID:SEC - Radiation Protection during Pregnancy Pregnancy and Radiation Exposure Information Sheet is an information sheet published by the Health Physics Society.

The most important thing to consider, is weighing the benefits of breastfeeding vs. the potential danger of radiation exposure. Breast milk in and of itself has life saving properties that are going to protect your baby's immune system far better then artificial milk.

The potential danger of radiation stems from the amount of radiation you have been subjected to. pregnant woman to mrem over the nine (9) month period has been estimated to Following a Nuclear Medicine test, patients are generally a source of radiation exposure.

Urine, feces, and blood may be slightly radioactive and should be handled with gloves. Hands should be washed in accordance with normal biohazard Radiation Safety for. Radiation exposure of the pregnant and breastfeeding patients in nuclear medicine. Date: 13 October2 pm CET (check time in your country) Presenter: Associate Prof.

Sigrid Leide-Svegborn, Department of Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, and. In that country, more than 70 percent of early-stage breast cancer patients were already receiving hypofractionated radiation therapy byBekelman's team found.

There were cost issues, too. Produced by the Health and Safety Department, the University of Edinburgh RP COP Working with Radiation when Pregnant or Breastfeeding.

Introduction This Code of Practice explains the risk to expectant and breastfeeding mothers from working with ionising radiation. It applies to any type ofFile Size: KB. Safety is a matter of taking appropriate actions to limit the risk to a level well justified by the benefit.

To maintain a high standard of safety, particularly when imaging pregnant or potentially pregnant patients, the degree of medical benefit outweighshould the well- to quantify and evaluate the potential effects of radiation delivered.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standards for Protection Against Radiation (10 CFR 20) require licensees to limit exposure to the embryo/fetus of an occupationally exposed individual to mrem (5 mSv) or less during pregnancy for a declared pregnant worker who is exposed to radiation from licensed radioactive materials (10 CFR Health & Safety and Pregnancy in Clinical Imaging and Radiotherapy Departments: A Guide for pregnant women, breast feeding women Published on Society of Radiographers () Section 2 of the Act places a general duty on employers to ensure the safety, health and welfare of their employees at work.

Pregnancy and radiation - what patients need to know. Breast feeding must stop before starting radio-iodine treatment as there is a risk of damaging the infant’s thyroid, causing permanent hypothyroidism and increasing the risk of thyroid cancer. lower exposure factors can be chosen and pregnant patients can have their pelvic regions.

The Content on this Site is presented in a summary fashion, and is intended to be used for educational and entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be and should not be interpreted as medical advice or a diagnosis of any health or fitness problem, condition or disease; or a recommendation for a specific test, doctor, care provider, procedure, treatment.

Specialists in Radiation Safety Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Adopted: June Updated: June The birth of a child is a life-changing experience. It is hard to prepare yourself for the joys—and yes, anxie-ties—of pregnancy and the subsequent raising of your child.

It can be a truly joyful, yet uncertain, Size: KB.Exposure to large amounts of radiation, equal to having more than chest X-rays at one time, is not common. It did happen to women in Japan after the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in If you do come in contact with large amounts of radiation, you may not feel sick, but the radiation may cause serious problems in your baby.My friend who had radiation because of a thyroid issue could not be around ANYONE, especially young kids and pregnant woment.

She had to stay in a hotel for 24 hours at least. My mother had radiation in February and March for her cancer, and she was able to be around me.